Monday, April 24, 2017

Month 9 Week 3

Discuss the democratic challenges African nations faced during 1996, are they any different to day?

5 comments:

  1. A few challenges the Africans faced was the immense heat in Africa. as well as the massive amount of land they hold. Because of this they probably suffered tension with their neighboring countries. Not only this, but they also suffer from shortages of food, and dehydration. Which is being helped by the USA, and other major countries.

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  2. The Democratic challenges that African Nations faced in the 1996 were based on the difficulties in changing the minds of people that had always thought a certain ways. There was dramatic changes that were occurring but a lot of the older people had trouble accepting these changes. It is different now because that generation of people is no longer around. It often times requires an entire generation to die before changes can be fully implemented.

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  3. During 1996, African nations were still struggling for democracy. Many were still under military or authoritarian rule, some after having civilian rule and democracy just barely in reach – only for it to be snatched from their grasp. Now, I think that most of the nations in Africa have achieved democracy and have to deal with more refined challenges, so to speak, that come once democracy has been set in place. Furthermore, in 1996, South African lawmakers passed a new, more democratic constitution. It guaranteed equal rights for all citizens and included a bill of rights modeled after the U.S. Bill of Rights, but with important differences that were tailored to their past struggles. The challenge of the constitution lay in the fact that the promises would be difficult to fulfill and that many South African blacks wanted instant results, which was unrealistic. I think this problem is quite similar to today’s issues. Even though we have laws and rights that are given to us in our constitution and bill of rights, people disobey them, whilst others want the law to be executed perfectly right at this very second.

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  4. Most notably, 1996 saw South African lawmakers pass a new, significantly more democratic constitution for the country. The constitution came with a U.S-influenced bill of rights that affirmed black South Africans' rights to free travel, expressly prohibited discrimination against minorities, protected the rights of children, etc. As explained by Kelly above, the sweeping changes outlined in the documents were clearly going to be hard to fulfill, and this caused tension with black South Africans who demanded immediate results. The path toward democracy was also speeding up elsewhere on the continent that year, as rebels began their march to overthrow Mobutu Sese Seko in the province of Zaire. The challenges of achieving freedom did not sink in that year, as their opposition was rather minimal during the march. Soon enough, however, Mobutu's successor, Laurent Kabila, failed to follow up on his claims of democratic transition by 1999, and a second civil war erupted between a trio of separate rebel forces and his one-party autocracy. South Africa's internal obstacles in 1996, in addition to the armed conflicts later seen in Zaire, are prime instances of the rockiness of the path to democracy, and this without a doubt extends to today. Achieving democratic progress in nations with histories of colonial domination or otherwise nondemocratic leadership is a timelessly difficult task. Like in South Africa, pro-change groups might grow impatient with the slowness of the path towards social and political progress, while in places like Zaire, traditionalist forces may attempt to cling to the old ways and block the path as much as possible. Issues like these are more visible than ever in our current United States, where the democratic practice has been firmly established for over two centuries. This goes to show that the path towards establishing stable democracy and equal rights for all citizens will always prove strenuous to some extent, no matter when or where you are.

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  5. By 1996, Africa had already taken the first couple of steps toward democracy by having all-race elections. During 1996, African lawmakers passed a new constitution that included a new bill of rights modeled after the American one. It gave regular, human rights to blacks that that didn't have before and began to shift the African world into a more modernized era.

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