Monday, February 27, 2017

Month 7 Week 3


In honor of Women's History month I would like you to answer the following question. 
Have women made a difference in history? Explain your answer so that others may comment.
Women in Historynt-i-a-woman

14 comments:

  1. Women have made a difference in history, whether it is women fighting to allow them to vote, or queens changing history. For example, the women’s suffrage was a fight against the government to allow women to vote. This was a success, because after this, women could vote. But, this isn’t all, queens in the past have also changed history. The Elizabeth family is a prime example, with their rule dating back to 1485.

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  2. Yes women have made a difference in history because look how far they have come. they weren't able to join the war, or vote or any thing like that. now they are equal of men. They marched on Versailles. it was a long road but they have really succeeded in making a name for themselves.

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  3. I think women have made a huge difference in history. Take Marie Curie for example. She discovered radium and was a pioneer in the study of radiation. Rosa Parks led movements for African Americans. Harriet Tubman freed slaves. If we didn't have these women, life as we know it wouldn't be the same.

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  4. Yes, women have made a difference in history. Harriet Tubman freed slaves, Clara Barton founded the American Red Cross, and Marie Curie was a renowned scientist. Also, Rosa Parks fought for civil rights.

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  5. Jessica Wills-PliskoMarch 13, 2017 at 10:46 AM

    Women have definitely made an impact in history. For example, Susan B. Anthony was raised in a Quaker family with deep roots in activism and social justice and became an advocate for women’s suffrage, women’s property rights and the abolition of slavery. In 1872, to challenge suffrage, Anthony tried to vote in the 1872 Presidential election. While Anthony was never able to legally vote, the 19th amendment, ratified in 1920, was named the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment.” Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman to receive a medical degree from an American medical school, after overcoming several odds against her – including admittance to an all-male institution and financing medical school. With Dr. Marie Zakrzewska, and her sister Emily, who also became a doctor, she opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children in 1856. A medical college was also opened along with it in 1857, which broadened opportunities for women doctors by providing training and necessary experience, as well as specialized medical care for the poor. More recently, Malala Yousafzai is a Pakistani advocate for girls education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate. In 2009, when Malala was just eleven she began blogging about life under the Taliban, speaking out directly against their threats to close girls’ schools. (Pakistan has the second highest number of children out of school and two-thirds of them are female.) The blog on BBC Urdu garnered international attention while also making her the target of death threats. In October 2012, a gunman shot her and two other girls as they were coming home from school. Malala survived the attack and in 2013 published an autobiography, I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban. In October 2014, Yousafzai received the Nobel Peace Prize, along with Indian children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi. These are just three examples of women who have made a difference in the world and history.

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  6. Women have made a strong impact on our history by getting women rights. Women like Susan B. Anthony helping to get us the right to vote. I'm sure she never thought a women would be running for president. There has been many women marches recently that we may never see the outcome or results of.

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  7. Heck yes, they have! Numerous women, iconic and unknown alike, have made massive impacts on world history and brought about great change. To say "no" to such a question is to neglect half of the human race. To give an example, I'll choose one that is relatively, and tragically, unknown: Elizabeth Cochran, known by the pseudonym Nellie Bly. She was a journalist, writer, industrialist, inventor, and charity worker. She gained fame and widespread recognition for an exposé in which she faked being insane to infiltrate the Women's Lunatic Asylum, as recorded in her book Ten Days in a Mad-House. After convincing all professionals that she was, as one doctor put it, "positively demented," she was able to investigate the brutality and neglect inflicted on the patients. Nellie also gained fame by traveling around the world in a record-breaking 72 days, as detailed in another of her novels, Around the World in Seventy-Two Days. She is remembered to this day as a trailblazer in her field, having launched a brave new kind of investigative journalism.

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  8. Women have most definitely made a tremendous difference in history! To put it bluntly, without women, the human race would be extinct! After all, behind every great man is a great woman. Every man who contributed something to history would not have been born without his mother, so, essentially, a woman was behind every one of these acts. Other than this obvious fact, women have made amazing impacts completely on their own. Just think about Rosa Parks, whose bravery made her a symbol of the civil rights movement; Florence Nightingale, a pioneer of the nursing profession who saved many lives during the Crimean War and later became known as the mother of modern nursing; Mother Teresa, who helped thousands of hurting, sick, and starving people; Marie Curie, a brilliant scientist and the first female winner of the Nobel Prize; Eleanor Roosevelt, who made immense contributions to human rights and helped draft the 1948 UN declaration of human rights, along with advising her husband - President Franklin D. Roosevelt; and Helen Keller, who was a champion for people with disabilities and made great strides for blind and deaf people. And these are just a few of the incredible women who have left their marks on history and on the world!!

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  9. Yes, women have made a huge impact on history. Marie Curie was a scientist who was the first to make important discoveries about radiation, Joan of Arc led a French Revolt against Britain, Cleopatra was the ruler of Egypt who worked to defend Egypt from the Roman Empire, and even Bonnie Parker showed that she could have a will of her to fire a gun and that not only men were willingly outlaws.

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  11. Woman have played a huge role in history. Some of the most important woman are:
    Joan of Arc (1412–1431) - at the age of just 17, Joan successfully led the French to victory at Orleans.
    Rosa Parks (1913–2005) – her refusal to give up her seat on the bus lead to some of the biggest civil rights legislation in history.
    Ann Frank (1929–1945) - Anne Frank’s diary is one of the most widely read books in the world.

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  12. Women have made a great difference in history. Women have been fighting for rights for a very very long time and look where we are now! Sojourner Truth stood up for women's rights and was an abolitionist. Its amazing to hear of an African-American women standing up for her rights in the 1800s. I think she would be very proud and happy of how far we have come in society.

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  14. I absolutely agree that women have made tremendous changes throughout history. Take for example one of the worlds most acclaimed female authors, Jane Austen. Miss Austen wrote several novels including Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and my personal favorite, Mansfield Park. At the time, female writers were not encouraged rather they were criticized. Nonetheless, Jane defied social and cultural standards. Her excellent use of irony and biting satire earned her great respect and historical importance amongst critics and scholars. Jane Austen certainly assisted in paving the way for future female writers.

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