Friday, February 10, 2017

Month 6 Week 4

Was Britain justified in selling opium to China? 
Follow the links below and use the information to support your claim.
Opium Trade and BritianOpium Trade

9 comments:

  1. Jessica Wills-PliskoFebruary 18, 2017 at 2:35 PM

    I do not believe the British were justified in selling Opium to China. I believe that the British should have stopped selling Opium after China had asked them to stop. Due to the Opium selling, the Chinese began to form an addiction to Opium, which ultimately led to the Opium War. While Opium trade solved the chronic trade imbalance, the Opium addiction remained a problem in China during subsequents decades which probably would not have occurred if Britain had stopped trading opium when China asked.

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  2. I do not think the British were justified in selling opium to China, because the opium trade caused many people to become addicted in China, which very negatively affected the country's economy as a whole.

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  3. I don't think that the British were justified in selling opium to china, because it caused many people to become addicted and this became a problem. The British were pretty much making money off of other people's addictions to a drug that ultimately caused negative health effects.

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  4. I do not believe that the British were justified in selling Opium to China. Many people became addicted to the Opium and to the corruption of officials. Also, the addiction grew so high that it affected imperial troops and official classes. The effort to restrict opium resulted in the Opium Wars. I believe Britain should have stopped after they were asked to stop.

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  5. I do not believe the British were justified in selling opium to China. They used drugs to get money to but the things they needed and when the Chinese Government tried to stop the British, the British went to war with them. Wars are never good but they are especially bad if they are fought to keep drugs legal. Therefore I dont think the British were justified.

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  6. NOTE: apologies for posting so late in the week. I'll try to get on earlier in the future.

    No, I do not believe that Britain was justified in their selling of opium to China. I understand that the Western demand for specifically Chinese goods such as porcelain was noticeably high, and that China's proud self-sufficiency didn't exactly make things easier. However, trade woes are not just reasoning for resorting to getting an entire nationality hooked on narcotics. They essentially infected the Chinese population with opium addiction, managing not only to affect the peasants, but to reach the official classes. Even worse, when the Ch'ing Dynasty enforced laws against the trade, they ignored them and carried onward. One of the world's great powers had essentially stooped to the lows of a street corner drug dealer, and on principal, that cannot be justified.

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  7. In my opinion, Britain was not at all justified in selling opium to China. For centuries, the Chinese had been using opium medicinally in limited amounts without a hitch. Then, when the habit of smoking tobacco spread to China, interest in smoking opium gained popularity, as well. All too quickly, European countries - Britain most of all - took advantage of this growing interest and began selling opium to China. They began selling a *drug* in order for it to be smoked, which would inevitably lead to addiction. This in itself is unacceptable to me. As much as people had a choice in whether or not to do the drug, they were not necessarily aware of its effects and the possibility of addiction. However, the British were aware of the drug and its effects, yet they seemed to be okay with essentially poisoning the Chinese populace. And all of this was done simply because the British were unhappy with how their trade with China was not in their own favor. Britain could have tried to make new trade items that China would want to purchase in exchange for their highly-desired porcelain, silks, and tea. Instead, Britain resorted to drug-dealing. That fact that when the Chinese asked them to stop the opium trade numerous times, the British refused, is horrible. They had no consideration of the countless Chinese lives they were negatively affecting and ruining in the process of making the opium trade flourish, just so that they could have everything their way.

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  8. No, the British were not justified in selling opium to China because when the drug began to cause monetary problems for the Chinese, the British did not stop the trade even though they were asked to. Opium even found its way high into the ranks of the government and military which showed that it was truly affecting the entire country. Britain's unwillingness to stop trade was to blame for the entire situation getting this out of hand.

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  9. I do not believe that the British were justified in selling opium to China because many Chinese citizens formed an unhealthy addiction to the drug. Eventually the emperor outlawed the possession, use, and trade of opium. However, the profits received were so numerous that an illegal trade soon developed. The Chinese government was incapable of terminating the illegal exportation, and the balance of trade between Europe and China gradually reversed.

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